OLLI Complimentary Programs

Open to the public

The fall term includes a variety of one-time lectures (Bonus Programs) that are free and open to OLLI members, guests, and the public.

Registration is not required for in-person Bonus Programs.

Registration is required (no cost) to access the Bonus Programs virtually through Zoom.

Register Online or call Registration Services (205) 348-3000 to enroll

For questions or more information call the OLLI Office at 205-348-6482


 

TUSCALOOSA 

In-Person Tuscaloosa Bonus Programs are held at the Bryant Conference Center,

Address: 240 Paul W Bryant Dr, Tuscaloosa, AL 35401

Coordinator: Sandra Hall Ray, raysandrahall@gmail.com and Ray Brignac

Parking at the University of Alabama, Capstone Parking Deck

UA’s College of Community Health Sciences and University Medical Center Partner with OLLI to present Mini Medical School.


TUS171 Mini-Medical School  

Tuesdays, Sept. 13, 20, 27; Oct. 4, 11, 18, 25; Nov. 2
12 – 1:15 p.m.
Bryant Conference Center
Coordinator: Dr. Ray Brignac and Emily Safron 

(Program Flyer) 

UA’s College of Community Health Sciences and University Medical Center is hosting a lecture series to explore medicine, health care, and health trends. Faculty physicians will lecture on issues and advances in medicine and research, incorporating science, research, and clinical applications. You will learn how the body works, hear about advances changing how we see disease and health, and find out where cutting-edge research is headed.  

Presenters will include, but are not limited to:  

Sept. 13  John McDonald: Update on screening for cervical cancer

Sept. 20 Dr. Sachin Shenoy: Incontinence  

Sept. 27 Dr. Richard Friend: Monkeypox

Oct. 4 Danielle Spree, Medicare Wellness Visits

Oct. 11 Dr. Tom Weida: COVID-19 update  

Oct. 18 Dr. Meenakshi Arora: New drug development  

Oct. 25 Dr. Brett Bentley: Common upper extremity injuries  

Nov. 1 Dr. John Burkhardt: How to meaningfully transition into retirement  


Bonus Programs  

Wednesday, Sept. 14, 21, 28; Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26; Nov. 2
Bryant Conference Center, UA Campus 

(Program Flyer)

Register for Each Separately.

TUS 172 How World Events Have Changed the FDA 
Sept. 14
Jane Rasco
As we are continuing to deal with the “current” world event, Jane Rasco will discuss with our class how 92 years of such world events have resulted in changes in the FDA’s mission and increased our protection. As an associate UA professor who oversees a lab of mice and rats (along with college students), she conducts toxicity screens on things that affect our everyday lives. We will learn why we need her lab results, the relationship with the FDA and what they do with what she and her students learn.     

  

TUS 173 A World Without Bees – Oh, No!
Sept. 21
David Crowe  

Albert Einstein was attributed (factually or not) to recognizing the fact and to have stated, “If the bee disappears from the surface of the Earth, man would have no more than four years left to live!” As David Crowe began his backyard garden over 50 years ago, he noticed that there were fewer and fewer bees. After more research, he realized the real crisis that was occurring and decided to become a beekeeper and help in his small way to remedy this. Great minds! Recent studies have confirmed the reduction of bees and the ecological balance that could be disturbed as a result.  

In this brief class, David will talk about the primary benefits of honeybees to mankind and what we can do to aid in their existence. Together, we will explore their life cycle and their day-to-day activities. We will review flowers and plants that attract bees. David is keenly interested in giving us tools to enhance the bee population individually and community-wide. If time permits, we will have a special treat and sample some fresh local honey. 

  

TUS 174 A Powerful Economic Driver for the State of Alabama, The Alabama Governor’s One-Shot Turkey Hunt   

Sept. 28
Bev Leigh  

The First Alabama Governor’s One-Shot Turkey Hunt to Recruit Industry for Alabama, Retain Existing Alabama Industry and Promote Alabama Tourism was hosted in Tuscaloosa in 2002 and continues today. The Hunt has proven to be a very effective economic driver while promoting Alabama’s rich natural resources including our majestic wild turkey. Annually it introduces approximately 70 industry decision-makers to the sport of spring turkey hunting on some of Alabama’s most beautiful farms while enjoying lots of good old Southern hospitality.  

  

TUS 175 Protecting the Consumer and Our Natural Resources 
Oct. 5
Marvin Rogers  

Marvin Rogers, General Counsel for the state Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, will give a presentation about the development of natural resources in Alabama, particularly oil and gas resources. Our state is rich in mineral resources, and Rogers will cover the early development of coal and iron ore, which led to the steel industry in Birmingham. He will address the discovery of oil during World War II. He will discuss how Alabama became a national leader in coalbed methane gas and the discovery of natural gas in offshore Alabama. Marvin will be available to answer questions about any number of related topics, including oil and gas leases, the current high price of gasoline, the state offshore trust fund, or anything else.  

    

TUS 176 One Continuous Second Childhood
Oct. 12
Jim McLean  

When we think of motorcycles, tattooed, leather-jacketed, Hell’s Angles come to mind. Rarely does the image of a retired dean and professor with over 60 years of riding experience pop up. But Jim McLean is that unique individual, and he will share how and why he became a loyal and impassioned biker. Jim has many tales of his early years as a racer and other adventures, and he will share his advice about bikes, travels and how to convince your spouse to come along. Weather permitting, one of his bikes will be on display for inspection and pictures.  

 

TUS 177 Alabama’s History Jewel here in Tuscaloosa
October 19
Rebecca Minder and Susan Reynolds  

Housed on the University of Alabama campus, Alabama Heritage magazine tells “the stories of Alabama that educate, inspire and entertain since 1986.” As a collaboration published by UA, UAB, and the Alabama Department of Archives and History, this home-grown magazine brings light to our history, known or not! Come enjoy the magazine staff as they share the decisions, research, and creation of the articles that make up almost 40 years of this celebrated Alabama jewel.  

  

TUS 178 From Willie Nelson to the Rude Mechanicals to the Medicis
October 26
Mark Hughes Cobb   

To find out about the arts scene in Tuscaloosa, those in the know check out Mark Hughes Cobb.  For decades, Mark has critiqued, promoted, defended, panned and participated in the varied arts choices in Tuscaloosa – and there are many. We will be entertained, educated, impassioned and amazed by him as he shares his experiences with us. Mark will explain how he became a founding member of the Rude Mechanicals and how he channels his artistic abilities into such a unique group.  From his experiences, we will learn about the expansion of the arts in Tuscaloosa and maybe even Alabama, how they intertwine and what important assets to our economy they are.  

  

TUS 179 Reading Allies: K-3 Literacy Support
Nov. 2
Claire Stebbins  

Reading Allies is an innovative, statewide literacy initiative that brings education institutions, businesses, local governments and the community together to help struggling readers in grades K-3.  The University of Alabama’s Claire Stebbins is the director of this collaboration.  She will share with us the needs, the program development, and the hoped-for future results.  Through her passion and compassion paired with the resources of our community, we will realize that a brighter future awaits our youngest, most vulnerable students.  

 


ONLINE Bonus Programs

Bonus Programs held at the Bryant Conference Center are also available online. Registration is required to receive the zoom link.
Wednesday, Sept. 14, 21, 28; Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26; Nov. 2

OL 151 How world Events Have Changed the FDA 
Sept. 14
Jane Rasco
As we are continuing to deal with the “current” world events, Jane Rasco will discuss with our class how 92 years of such events have resulted in changes in the FDA’s mission and increased our protection.  As an associate UA professor who oversees a lab of mice and rats (along with college students), she conducts toxicity screens on things that affect our everyday lives.  We will learn why we need her lab results, the relationship with the FDA and what they do with what she and her students learn.     

OL 152 A World Without Bees – Oh, No! 
Sept. 21
David Crowe  

 Albert Einstein was attributed (factually or not) to recognizing the fact and to have stated, “If the bee disappears from the surface of the Earth, man would have no more than four years left to live!” As David Crowe began his backyard garden over 50 years ago, he noticed that there were fewer and fewer bees. After more research, he realized the real crisis that was occurring and decided to become a beekeeper and help in his small way to remedy this. Great minds! Recent studies have confirmed the reduction of bees and the ecological balance that could be disturbed as a result.  

In this brief class, David will talk about the primary benefits of honeybees to mankind and what we can do to aid in their existence. Together, we will explore their life cycle and their day-to-day activities. We will review flowers and plants that attract bees. David is keenly interested in giving us tools to enhance the bee population individually and community-wide. If time permits, we will have a special treat and sample some fresh local honey 

OL 153  A Powerful Economic Driver for the State of Alabama, The Alabama Governor’s One-Shot Turkey Hunt  
Sept. 28
Bev Leigh  

The First Alabama Governor’s One-Shot Turkey Hunt to Recruit Industry for Alabama, Retain Existing Alabama Industry and Promote Alabama Tourism was hosted in Tuscaloosa in 2002 and continues today.  The Hunt has proven to be a very effective economic driver while promoting Alabama’s rich natural resources including our majestic wild turkey.   Annually it introduces approximately 70 industry decision-makers to the sport of spring turkey hunting on some of Alabama’s most beautiful farms while enjoying lots of good old Southern hospitality.  

OL 154 Protecting the Consumer and Our Natural Resources 
Oct. 5
Marvin Rogers  

Marvin Rogers, General Counsel for the state Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, will give a presentation about the development of natural resources in Alabama, particularly oil and gas resources.  Our state is rich in mineral resources, and Rogers will cover the early development of coal and iron ore, which led to the steel industry in Birmingham. He will address the discovery of oil during World War II. He will discuss how Alabama became a national leader in coalbed methane gas and the discovery of natural gas in offshore Alabama.  Marvin will be available to answer questions about any number of related topics, including oil and gas leases, the current high price of gasoline, the state offshore trust fund, or anything else.  

OL 155 One Continuous Second Childhood 
Oct. 12
Jim McLean  

 When we think of motorcycles, tattooed, leather-jacketed, Hell’s Angles come to mind.  Rarely does the image of a retired dean and professor with over 60 years of riding experience pop up.  But Jim McLean is that unique individual, and he will share how and why he became a loyal and impassioned biker.  Jim has many tales of his early years as a racer and other adventures, and he will share his advice about bikes, travels and how to convince your spouse to come along.  Weather permitting, one of his bikes will be on display for inspection and pictures.  

OL 156 Alabama’s History Jewel here in Tuscaloosa 
October 19
Rebecca Minder and Susan Reynolds  

Housed on the University of Alabama campus, Alabama Heritage magazine tells “the stories of Alabama that educate, inspire and entertain since 1986.” As a collaboration published by UA, UAB and the Alabama Department of Archives and History, this home-grown magazine brings light to our history known or not! Come enjoy the magazine staff as they share the decisions, research, and creation of the articles that make up almost 40 years of this celebrated Alabama jewel.  

OL 157 From Willie Nelson to the Rude Mechanicals to the Medicis 
October 26
Mark Hughes Cobb   

To find out about the arts scene in Tuscaloosa, those in the know check out Mark Hughes Cobb.  For decades, Mark has critiqued, promoted, defended, panned and participated in the varied arts choices in Tuscaloosa, and there are many. We will be entertained, educated, impassioned and amazed by him as he shares his experiences with us. Mark will explain how he became a founding member of the Rude Mechanicals and how he channels his artistic abilities into such a unique group.  From his experiences, we will learn about the expansion of the arts in Tuscaloosa and maybe even Alabama, how they intertwine, and what important assets to our economy they are.  

OL 158 Reading Allies: K-3 Literacy Support 
Nov 2
Claire Stebbins  

Reading Allies is an innovative, statewide literacy initiative that brings education institutions, businesses, local governments, and the community together to help struggling readers in grades K-3.  Claire Stebbins, with UA, is the Director of this collaboration.  She will share with us the needs, the program development, and the hoped-for future results.  Through her passion and compassion paired with the resources of our community, we will realize that a brighter future awaits our youngest, needy students.  

 


GADSDEN 

In-Person Gadsden Bonus Programs are held at the UA Gadsden Center

Address: 121 N 1st St, Gadsden, AL 35901

Coordinator: Shirley du Pont, slild01@aol.com

Parking: No cost

(Program Flyer)

 

Thursdays, Sept. 15, 22, 29; Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27; Nov. 3
Time: 1:30 – 2:45 p.m.
Location: UA Gadsden Center (Room 202)  

  

GAD 120 Tuxedo Junction: Alabama’s Contribution to American Jazz
Sept. 15
Tyler Malugani 

As the country moved into the 20th century, a new style of music began to grip the nation: jazz. Created in New Orleans, it quickly spread to all corners of the United States. Birmingham became a hub of jazz music in the South, attracting talented and world-famous musicians to play in the famed Tuxedo Junction. This area of Birmingham not only inspired many jazz musicians but also played an essential role in African American culture in Birmingham and was a welcome distraction to men who worked the intense jobs of local industry.  

 

GAD 121 Let’s “Play” with Shakespeare!
Sept. 22
Carmen DiBiase 

This will be a survey of several Shakespearean plays in which we find a recurring motif that helps us understand why his plays are so enduring and so gripping down to the present day. Shakespeare often places a medieval character in a modern setting and forces him – it is always “him” and not “her” – to adapt. Shakespeare’s medieval world was essentially male. The character’s identity is defined by action; Shakespeare’s modern world is essentially feminine, unfolding in the domestic sphere, usually inside private quarters, and there, identity is shaped not by action but by thought. Illustrative plays will be King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. 

 

GAD 123 Michigan: Mackinac, Tulips, and Mushroom Houses
Sept. 29 Sheila Mountain 

Be prepared to see unusual, historical, and beautiful sites. In the late 19th century, Mackinac Island became a popular tourist attraction and summer colony. Because of its historical significance, the entire island is listed as a National Historic Landmark. It is well known for numerous cultural events, a wide variety of architectural styles, including the Victorian Grand Hotel, and its ban on almost all motor vehicles Few places can match the beauty of Holland, Michigan, in the Spring when millions of tulips burst forth with fantastic color in local parks and line the streets. The custom homes of Earl Young are referred to as mushroom homes, but these iconic structures’ cute names do not diminish their lasting impact. Each house is different, and they are known creatively as Gnome Homes, Mushroom Houses and Hobbit Houses. 

 

GAD 124 Walk Through Time
Oct. 6
Puddin McArthur 

“Walk Through Time” is held on the third Sunday in October each year at Forrest Cemetery. The event has been celebrated for over 10 years. City trolleys transport patrons back in time to the cemetery, where they stroll at their leisure. Modern citizens dress in period clothing to portray some of Gadsden’s most interesting citizens from various eras gone by. A portion of the characters can be seen throughout the afternoon in the chapel. No admission is charged for the event, but donations are greatly appreciated as all proceeds go to preserve the cemetery. 

 

GAD 125 Our Herbal Heritage
Oct. 13
Daryl Patton 

For the past 35 years, Darryl Patton has been hunting, gathering and working with medicinal plants on Lookout Mountain in the Southern Appalachians. Darryl is an ND and a Master Herbalist and brings many years of experience to the field of alternative medicine. Known for his easy-going approach to teaching the identification and uses of medicinal plants, Darryl has been called a walking encyclopedia of herbal folklore.  

 

GAD 126 Cruising the Danube
Oct. 20
Elizabeth Wheeler 

Coursing through Germany, Austria, Hungary and seven other countries all the way to the Black Sea, the Danube is the soul of Central Europe. Join us along these culture-rich banks, whose scenic vineyards, ancient monasteries and elegant cities have inspired travelers for centuries. This will be the trip of a lifetime. 

 

GAD 127 China
Oct. 27
Francine Marasco 

China offers so much to see and explore with a vast territory and a long history. Beijing is the home to many of China’s big-ticket attractions: The Forbidden City, the Great Wall, Tiananmen Square, the Summer Palace and more. Shanghai is glitzy, elegant, historic and cosmopolitan — everything you’ve heard about the city is true. Then there is Guangzhou, Chengdu Xi’an, the Terracotta Warriors and the Yangtze River. Join as Francine Marasco takes us on a tour of the great sites in China, as only she can. Sit back and enjoy the ride. 

 

GAD 129 Miniatures
Nov. 3
Note NEW time/location: This bonus program will be offsite at 3 pm. The address and directions will be sent after you have registered.
Catherine Hawkins 

Miniatures have existed for hundreds of centuries. From the elegant “cabinet houses” of the wealthy Dutch families to the utilitarian German miniature kitchens, countless people have been fascinated by these tiny settings. Miniatures have been found in Egyptian tombs from almost 4,000 years ago. Join us as we visit Catherine’s home and many miniatures. We will carpool to the location. 

Questions?

 Email OLLI

Phone:  (205) 348-6482